Titles and Affiliations

Chairwoman, Genomic Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic
American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professor
Sondra J. and Stephen R. Hardis Chair of Cancer Genomic Medicine
Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Genetics
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, Ohio

Research area

Uncovering the complex biology behind inherited cancers to better predict risk and discover new therapeutic strategies for patients.

Impact

Genetics are a major contributor to heritable breast cancer, but not all patients with mutated genes will develop the disease. For those who do develop cancer, scientists remain unsure as to why, and this hampers the design of effective predictive tests, prevention strategies, and therapies. BRCA mutations are the most well-known inherited mutations for breast cancer, but there are many more. Dr. Eng studies the gene PTEN, which her group identified as a tumor suppressor—it prevents healthy cells from becoming cancerous. When PTEN it is altered its tumor-blocking functions can be lost. The importance of PTEN is underscored in the familial cancer disorder PTEN Hamartoma Syndrome (PHTS). These individuals inherit mutations in PTEN and have an 85 percent risk of developing breast cancer and other cancers. Dr. Eng’s work explores what additional factors are required to tip the scales and initiate cancer in individuals with PHTS, which could also inform our understanding of how cancer forms in other heritable breast cancers. 

Progress Thus Far

Several biological factors could induce cancer in individuals with PTEN mutations, including additional inherited genetic alterations; spontaneous mutations that develop during a patient’s lifetime; and systemic, non-genetic, changes in the body (e.g., changes in metabolism or immunity). Dr. Eng and team pursued another inherited genetic alteration in the gene WWP2 and found that it is associated with reducing PTEN levels. Dr. Eng’s team also revealed that PHTS-related breast tumors are genetically unique when compared to non-heritable breast cancers, potentially dulling the effectiveness of conventional therapies in this population. The team also looked at the role of metabolism—tumors have their own unique processes for sugar, oxygen, and other nutrients—and found that metabolic processes differ between PHTS individuals with cancer versus those without. 

What’s next

Dr. Eng and team will work to confirm if WWP2 is a regulator of PTEN, making it a potential diagnostic factor and therapeutic target for some PHTS patients. And after identifying distinct metabolic profiles between PHTS individuals with and without cancer, Dr. Eng’s team will see if they can generate a “metabotype”—a list of cancer-specific metabolites that could be used in a laboratory test to predict cancer risk for PHTS. 

Biography

Charis Eng, MD, PhD is the founding Chair of the Genomic Medicine Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, founding Director of the institute’s clinical component, the Center for Personalized Genetic Healthcare, and Professor and Vice Chairman of the Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. She was honored with the Hardis Endowed Chair in Cancer Genomic Medicine in 2008 and the American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship in 2009. In 2011, she was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the US National Academies of Sciences for her achievements and leadership in genetics- and genomics-based research and personalized healthcare. Her research has been acknowledged as the paradigm for performing cancer genetics research which can be brought to clinical practice. At the clinical interface, she is acknowledged as one of the rare "go to" people on what is and how to implement genetic- and genomics-enabled personalized healthcare.

BCRF Investigator Since

2007

Donor Recognition

The von Mandl Family Foundation Award